Big Ginger (little cinnamon) Pumpkin Porter

Brewing season is among us in the south finally.  Well, finally for those of us without controlled fermentation space like a basement or a keezer.  If you’ve been paying attention I finally put the investment into all grain brewing and this will be my second brew.  The first didn’t turn out so well, but no worries it was built as a test batch with very little money involved, or so I thought.  This batch was built to succeed and didn’t cost much more than the last.  So I guess it’s true, all grain brewing is less expensive AFTER the initial investment in hardware.

I brewed this during last year’s Bumpkin Fest at Gratis Brewing.  The biggest difference was there it was IN a pumpkin, here not so much.  Also I left out the dry ingredients to make graham crackers, along with nutmeg and cloves.  I had a sugar pumpkin, also known as a baking pumpkin that weighed around 7 pounds.  I roasted it in the oven covered in cinnamon then added half of it to the mash and the rest towards the end of the boil.  Also in the boil was 2 pounds of brown sugar, 2 ounces of peeled fresh ginger root and an ounce of cinnamon sticks.

I once again was busy with work and other stuff so I wasn’t able to rack this to secondary after a couple of weeks.  So instead it went straight from fermentation to bottling after a month.  Just to be cautious I didn’t add any spices to the bottling bucket after last year’s were carbonated bottle rockets.  Which probably came from me adding too much priming sugar.  I opened one of last year’s on Halloween and after the carbonation died down and I let it settle for about 15-20 minutes it was still very good.

I’m happy to report that this year’s is amazing too.  I finally opened a bottle after being away on work for a week, then instantly loading the fridge with four more bottles.  I’m calling it Big Ginger Pumpkin Porter.  The ginger shines through with some cinnamon poking it’s stick in at times (see what I did there, cinnamon sticks) and the pumpkin is ever-present in the silky smoothness on the tongue.

The plan is to have a ‘bottle release’ paired with Sarah’s pumpkin cheesecake along with the next brew, a chocolate porter, which will be paired with chocolate pie.  Keep an ear open for your invite, it’s soon I hope.

Salute!

Chuck's favorite DME

Chuck’s favorite DME

pumpkin and seeds

pumpkin and seeds

grain bill

grain bill

cinnamon roasted pumpkin mash

cinnamon roasted pumpkin mash

drained mash tun

drained mash tun

first runnings

first runnings

fresh ingredients

fresh ingredients

Finally boiling, time for a Schlafly pumpkin ale

Finally boiling, time for a Schlafly pumpkin ale

pumpkin porter

pumpkin porter

Posted on November 17, 2013, in homebrew and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Great pictures! Interesting that you put some of the pumpkin straight into the mash. I would not have thought of that. How do you think that affects the final product? I wonder if it boosts the caramelized-sugar flavors.

    • Crap, sorry I haven’t replied. Pumpkin does nothing much other than add mouthfeel to the beer. I’d imagine adding whole, fresh pumpkin to the mash alone would be a complete waste. Adding pumpkin purée in earlier brews to the boil has made substantial impact. I think I didn’t roast my pumpkin long enough either, as it was barely soft after the mash and the boil. I would have liked to seen it resemble purée after each process. Last year I added cinnamon, ginger, allspice and nutmeg while boiling the priming sugar and it had a great taste, but over carbonated. I wanted to avoid that this year so only added fresh ginger root & cinnamon sticks to the boil. Good, but no upfront pumpkin pie taste. Cheers!h

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